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Bears general manager Ryan Pace is good at finding steals in the later rounds of the NFL Draft. And it’s a good thing, too, seeing as the Bears aren’t armed with any first- or second-round picks in this year’s draft.

Chicago has just five draft picks in 2019, which is second only to the Seattle Seahawks as the least in the league. But when you consider the players the Bears got as a result of traded picks — Khalil Mack, who cost two first-round picks, and Anthony Miller, who cost a 2019 second-round selection — you see the value in those trades.

The Bears won’t pick until the third round with No. 87. They also have one pick in each of the fourth and fifth rounds, as well as two picks in the seventh round.

But as Pace has proven in the past, he’s not afraid to trade up if he sees his guy sitting there. Pace has traded up in the draft at least once in the past three years. Of the eight trades Pace has made in the past three drafts, five of them have been to draft players that he’s coveted.

It’s that conviction that has brought him players like Eddie Jackson, Mitch Trubisky, Anthony Miller and Leonard Floyd. It’s also why you can’t help but wonder if Pace is looking to trade up in a draft where he doesn’t have any first or second round picks.

When asked if there was a scenario where the Bears could trade back into the first round, Pace didn’t think it was a possibility.

“That would be tough,” Pace said during his pre-draft press conference on Monday. “It would be hard, just because we don’t have a lot of ammunition.”

That ammunition being those five draft picks in 2019. But the Bears have also have seven draft picks, along with three conditional picks, in 2020, which might help, should Pace decide he wants to pull the trigger on someone in the first or second round.

While Pace essentially shot down the idea of trading into the first round, he didn’t flat-out say dismiss it either. Then there’s the possibility of moving into the second round.

It’s that game of chess that has made Pace quite the general during the draft. And it’s exactly why it’s nearly impossible to guess Pace’s next move.